Design thinking is a process for creative problem solving. Design thinking has a human-centered core. It encourages organizations to focus on the people they’re creating for, which leads to better products, services, and internal processes. User experience (UX) is a person’s emotions and attitudes about using a particular product, system or service. It includes the practical, experiential, affective, meaningful and valuable aspects of human–computer interaction and product ownership.

In the early stages of constructing my MTA Portfolio, I kept hearing about design thinking.

When I realised how useful design thinking and its five stage process – Empathise, Define (the problem), Ideate, Prototype, and Test – is for solving all types of problems, I had to add it include it in my postgraduate studies, because problem-solving is at the heart of my MTA Portfolio. 

Design thinking is included in my Creative Producing and Entrepreneurship concentration because creativity and problem-solving (which is the essence of entrepreneurship) go hand-in-hand. I have never solved a single problem without employing some creativity. 

I have found the design thinking process to be hugely invaluable. I have used it in my life coaching and I even employed it in the construction of my MTA Portfolio. In many ways, the ten concentrations of this portfolio are my way of prototyping and testing out ten different career routes. 

User experience is often confused with design thinking and I included it in this module so that I could get comfortable with separating the competencies. 

Arguably, user experience would be better suited in my Multimedia Studies and Creative Technologies concentration because that includes my web design studies which employs user experience as an essential part of the web development process.

However, it is included in my Creative Producing and Entrepreneurship concentration because, just like design thinking, user experience can be applied to almost anything… and that’s the point of this concentration, it’s a toolkit for problem-solving.

17 Courses

Design Thinking for Innovation

Platform: Coursera

Institution: University of Virgnia

Started: 31/03/2016

Finished: 30/06/2016

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Design Thinking: Understanding the Process

Platform: LinkedIn

Institution: LinkedIn Learning

Started: 02/12/2017

Finished: 02/12/2017

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Design Thinking: Implementing the Process

Platform: LinkedIn

Institution: LinkedIn Learning

Started: 02/12/2017

Finished: 03/12/2017

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Design Thinking: Prototyping

Platform: LinkedIn

Institution: LinkedIn Learning

Started: 06/12/2017

Finished: 06/12/2017

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Design Thinking: Venture Design

Platform: LinkedIn

Institution: LinkedIn Learning

Started: 06/12/2017

Finished: 06/12/2017

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Design Thinking: Customer Experience

Platform: LinkedIn

Institution: LinkedIn Learning

Started: 06/12/2017

Finished: 06/12/2017

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Learning Design Thinking: Lead Change in Your Organization

Platform: LinkedIn

Institution: LinkedIn Learning

Started: 05/12/2017

Finished: 06/12/2017

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frog's FEMA Disaster Relief Innovation: Design Thinking in Action

Platform: LinkedIn

Institution: LinkedIn Learning

Started: 06/12/2017

Finished: 06/12/2017

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Learning Brainstorming

Platform: LinkedIn

Institution: LinkedIn Learning

Started: 06/12/2017

Finished: 06/12/2017

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Learning Design Research

Platform: LinkedIn

Institution: LinkedIn Learning

Started: 06/12/2017

Finished: 20/12/2017

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UX Design: 1 Overview

Platform: LinkedIn

Institution: LinkedIn Learning

Started: 08/03/2018

Finished: 08/03/2018

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UX Design: 2 Analyzing User Data

Platform: LinkedIn

Institution: LinkedIn Learning

Started: 09/03/2018

Finished: 09/03/2018

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UX Design: 3 Creating Personas

Platform: LinkedIn

Institution: LinkedIn Learning

Started: 13/03/2018

Finished: 13/03/2018

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UX Design 4: Ideation

Platform: LinkedIn

Institution: LinkedIn Learning

Started: 14/03/2018

Finished: 14/03/2018

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UX Design: 5 Creating Scenarios and Storyboards

Platform: LinkedIn

Institution: LinkedIn Learning

Started: 15/03/2018

Finished: 15/03/2018

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UX Design: 6 Paper Prototyping

Platform: LinkedIn

Institution: LinkedIn Learning

Started: 15/03/2018

Finished: 15/03/2018

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UX Design: 7 Implementation Planning

Platform: LinkedIn

Institution: LinkedIn Learning

Started: 16/03/2018

Finished: 16/03/2018

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1 Book

Design for the Real World: Human Ecology and Social Change

Author: Victor Papanek

Publisher: Academy Chicago Publishers

Published: 2005 (first published 1972)

Started: 29/03/2018

Finished: 19/10/2018

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On the surface, design thinking and UX have little in common. The former is management consulting for creatives, while the latter focuses on better products and services. Yet, take a closer look at them both, and they share quite a bit. While design thinking is popularly recognized as the combination of user observation, analytics, and synthesis thinking, in reality what defines it is the process, which looks suspiciously like that associated with UX.
UX and design thinking seem like two sides of the same coin; the first is the more tactical and build-oriented manifestation, whereas the latter is the more strategic and conceptual manifestation.

Dirk Knemeyer, Design Thinking and UX: Two Sides of the Same Coin, ACM Interactions, interactions.acm.org, 2015