Industry 4.0, or the Fourth Industrial Revolution, refers to the ongoing automation of traditional manufacturing and industrial practices, using modern smart technology. Large-scale machine-to-machine communication (M2M) and the internet of things (IoT) are integrated for increased automation, improved communication and self-monitoring, and production of smart machines that can analyze and diagnose issues without the need for human intervention.
  • The First Industrial Revolution marked the transition from hand production methods to machines through the use of steam power and water power.
  • The Second Industrial Revolution, also known as the Technological Revolution, occurred between 1871 and 1914 is the transition from installations of extensive railroad and telegraph networks, which allowed for faster transfer of people and ideas, as well as electricity. Increasing electrification allowed for factories to develop the modern production line. 
  • The Third Industrial Revolution, also known as the Digital Revolution, occurred in the late 20th century, after the end of the two world wars. The production of the Z1 computer was the beginning of more advanced digital developments. This continued with the next significant progress in the development of communication technologies with the supercomputer. In this process, where there was extensive use of computer and communication technologies in the production process. 

Industrial revolutions have always formed key topics of discussion when dealing with multimedia studies and creative technologies, so it was only natural that I would include a module devoted to our current industrial revolution. 

I also included it because I am increasingly fascinated by 3D printing and the potential of using digital making and manufacturing for business creation and social enterprise purposes. 

7 Courses

The 3D Printing Revolution

Platform: Coursera

Institution: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Started: 21/05/2016

Finished: 27/05/2016

Go to course on Class Central

 

Digital Manufacturing & Design

Platform: Coursera

Institution: The State University of New York & University of Buffalo

Started: 05/09/2017

Finished: 07/09/2017

Go to course on Class Central

 

Digital Threads: Components

Platform: Coursera

Institution: The State University of New York & University of Buffalo

Started: 28/10/2017

Finished: 28/10/2017

Go to course on Class Central

 

Digital Threads: Implementation

Platform: Coursera

Institution: The State University of New York & University of Buffalo

Started: 28/10/2017

Finished: 28/10/2017

Go to course on Class Central

 

Advanced Manufacturing Process Analysis

Platform: Coursera

Institution: The State University of New York & University of Buffalo

Started: 20/04/2020

Finished: 20/04/2020

Go to course on Class Central

 

Intelligent Machining

Platform: Coursera

Institution: The State University of New York & University of Buffalo

Started: 21/04/2020

Finished: 22/04/2020

Go to course on Class Central

 

Advanced Manufacturing Enterprise

Platform: Coursera

Institution: The State University of New York & University of Buffalo

Started: 23/04/2020

Finished: 28/04/2020

Go to course on Class Central

 

1 Book

The Maker Movement Manifesto: Rules for Innovation in the New World of Crafters, Hackers, and Tinkerers

Author: Mark Hatch

Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education

Published: 2014

Started: 28/09/2018

Finished: 30/09/2018

Go to book on Goodreads

 

Like the revolutions that preceded it, the Fourth Industrial Revolution has the potential to raise global income levels and improve the quality of life for populations around the world. To date, those who have gained the most from it have been consumers able to afford and access the digital world; technology has made possible new products and services that increase the efficiency and pleasure of our personal lives. Ordering a cab, booking a flight, buying a product, making a payment, listening to music, watching a film, or playing a game—any of these can now be done remotely.
In the future, technological innovation will also lead to a supply-side miracle, with long-term gains in efficiency and productivity. Transportation and communication costs will drop, logistics and global supply chains will become more effective, and the cost of trade will diminish, all of which will open new markets and drive economic growth.

Klaus Schwab, The Fourth Industrial Revolution: what it means, how to respond, World Economic Forum, weforum.org