The concept of telling a single or a series of interconnected stories across different media is becoming more mainstream and says a great deal about the interconnected nature of our world.

Transmedia storytelling is unfinished business from my undergraduate degree.

I was first introduced to the concept of transmedia storytelling in the final year of my Bachelor’s degree, where one of my media tutors pitched it to me as potential manifestation for my final year creative enterprise project.

Ultimately, I instead constucted a web series concept proposal package that was told through one form of media. I decided against going down the full transmedia route because it would have become very complicated very quickly and would have created more work that I didn’t have time to do.

However, I was still fascinated with the potential of transmedia and really wanted to get my teeth into figuring it out a bit further.

3 Courses

Transmedia Storytelling

Platform: FutureLearn

Institution: Sungkyunkwan University

Started: 18/01/2016

Finished: 25/06/2016

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Transmedia Storytelling: Narrative worlds, emerging technologies, and global audiences

Platform: Coursera

Institution: The University of New South Wales & X Media Lab

Started: 01/10/2016

Finished: 01/09/2020

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Transmedia Writing

Platform: Coursera

Institution: Michigan State University

Started: 24/08/2017

Finished: 05/09/2017

Go to course on Class Central

 

In the ideal form of transmedia storytelling, each medium does what it does best-so that a story might be introduced in a film, expanded through television, novels, and comics, and its world might be explored and experienced through game play. Each franchise entry needs to be self-contained enough to enable autonomous consumption. That is, you don’t need to have seen the film to enjoy the game and vice-versa. Any given product is a point of entry into the franchise as a whole.

Henry Jenkins, Transmedia Storytelling: Moving characters from books to films to video games can make them stronger and more compelling, MIT Technology Review, 15/03/2003