Virtual reality 

Virtual reality (VR) is a simulated experience that can be similar to or completely different from the real world. Applications of virtual reality can include entertainment (i.e. video games) and educational purposes (i.e. medical or military training). Other, distinct types of VR style technology include augmented reality and mixed reality, sometimes referred to as extended reality or XR.[1]

 

Game Design 

Game design is the art of applying design and aesthetics to create a game for entertainment or for educational, exercise, or experimental purposes. Increasingly, elements and principles of game design are also applied to other interactions, in the form of gamification.

Game design creates goals, rules and challenges to define a board game, card game, dice game, casino game, role-playing game, sport, video game, war game or simulation that produces desirable interactions among its participants and, possibly, spectators.

 

 

 

11 Courses

How Virtual Reality Works

Platform: edX

Institution: University of California, San Diego

Started: 03/10/2017

Finished: 14/10/2017

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Introduction to Virtual Reality

Platform: Coursera

Institution: University of London

Started: 26/10/2017

Finished: 28/10/2017

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Virtual Reality Foundations

Platform: LinkedIn

Institution: LinkedIn Learning

Started: 27/01/2018

Finished: 27/01/2018

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Virtual & Augmented Reality for 3D Weekly

Platform: LinkedIn

Institution: LinkedIn Learning

Started: 31/01/2018

Finished: 05/02/2018

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Virtual Reality Overview for Developers

Platform: LinkedIn

Institution: LinkedIn Learning

Started: 07/03/2018

Finished: 08/03/2018

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Learning VR Photography and Video

Platform: LinkedIn

Institution: LinkedIn Learning

Started: 29/03/2018

Finished: 30/03/2018

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VR Video and Photography: Storytelling

Platform: LinkedIn

Institution: LinkedIn Learning

Started: 12/05/2018

Finished: 12/05/2018

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Introduction to Game Design

Platform: Coursera

Institution: California Institute of the Arts

Started: 28/02/2019

Finished: 28/02/2019

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Game Design Foundations 1: Ideas, Core Loops, and Goals

Platform: LinkedIn

Institution: LinkedIn Learning

Started: 30/05/2020

Finished: 30/05/2020

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Game Design Foundations 2: Systems, Chance, and Strategy

Platform: LinkedIn

Institution: LinkedIn Learning

Started: 30/05/2020

Finished: 31/05/2020

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Game Design Foundations: 3 Pitch, Propose, and Practice

Platform: LinkedIn

Institution: LinkedIn Learning

Started: 31/05/2019

Finished: 31/05/2019

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The form of any game is of first importance. Game theory, like information theory, has ignored this aspect of game and information movement. Both theories have dealt with the information content of systems, and have observed the ‘noise’ and ‘deception’ factors that divert data. This is like approaching a painting or a musical composition from the point of view of its content. In other words, it is guaranteed to miss the central structural core of the experience. For as it is the pattern of a game that gives it relevance to our inner lives, and not who is playing nor the outcome of the game, so it is with information movement. The selection of our human senses employed makes all the difference say between photo and telegraph. In the arts the particular mix of our senses in the medium employed is all-important. The ostensible program content is a lulling distraction needed to enable the structured form to get through the barriers of conscious attention. 

Marshall McLuhan, Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man, 1966:214