10 Courses

Global Prosperity Beyond GDP

Platform: FutureLearn

Institution: University College London

Started: 01/01/2018

Finished: 02/02/2018

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Exploring Economics: Will the Next Generation Be Worse Off?

Platform: FutureLearn

Institution: Griffith University

Started: 02/01/2017

Finished: 03/02/2018

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The Global Financial Crisis

Platform: Coursera

Institution: Yale University

Started: 05/07/2016

Finished: 02/09/2016

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The Power of Microeconomics: Economic Principles in the Real World

Platform: Coursera

Institutions: University of California, Irvine

Started: 13/10/2015

Finished: 15/08/2016

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The Power of Macroeconomics: Economic Principles in the Real World

Platform: Coursera

Institution: University of California, Irvine

Started: 15/08/2016

Finished: 17/05/2017

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The Politics of Economics and the Economics of Politicians

Platform: FutureLearn

Institution: University of Nottingham

Started: 12/04/2017

Finished: 21/04/2017

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Understanding economic policymaking

Platform: Coursera

Institution: IE Business School

Started: 

Finished: 

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Trade, Immigration and Exchange Rates in a Globalized World

Platform: Coursera

Institution: IE Business School

Started: 

Finished: 

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International Business I

Platform: Coursera

Institution: University of New Mexico

Started: 19/01/2016

Finished: 02/02/2016

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International Business II

Platform: Coursera

Institution: University of New Mexico

Started: 02/02/2016

Finished: 12/03/2016

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8 Books

Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist

Author: Kate Raworth

Publisher: Random House Audiobooks

Published: 2017

Started: 11/05/2018

Finished: 27/06/2018

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Economics: The User's Guide: A Pelican Introduction

Author: Ha-Joon Chang

Publisher: Pelican

Published: 2014

Started: 19/09/2014

Finished: 17/01/2016

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1493: Uncovering the New World Columbus Created

Author: Charles C. Mann

Publisher: Random House Audio

Published: 2011

Started: 22/07/2017

Finished: 01/11/2017

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The Worldly Philosophers

Author: Robert L. Heilbroner

Publisher: Touchstone/Simon & Schuster (NY)

Published: 1972

Started: 01/08/2017

Finished: 07/09/2017

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Capital in the Twenty-First Century

Author: Thomas Piketty

Publisher: Audible, Inc

Published: 2014

Started: 16/06/2020

Finished: 22/05/2021

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Debt: The First 5,000 Years

Author: David Graeber

Publisher: Gildan Media, LLC

Published: 2015

Started: 29/01/2021

Finished: 29/05/2021

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Debt or Democracy: Public Money for Sustainability and Social Justice

Author: Mary Mellor

Publisher: Pluto Press

Published: 2015

Started: 26/02/2020

Finished: 17/05/2020

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Utopia for Realists: The Case for a Universal Basic Income, Open Borders, and a 15-hour Workweek

Author: Rutger Bregman

Publisher: The Correspondent

Published: 2016

Started: 11/08/2016

Finished: 06/05/2017

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Acknowledging the difficulties involved in changing the economic status quo should not cause us to give up the fight to create an economy that is more dynamic, more stable, more equitable and more environmentally sustainable than what we have had for the last three decades. Yes, changes are difficult, but, in the long run, when people fight for them, many ‘impossible’ things happen. Just remember: 200 years ago, many Americans thought it was totally unrealistic to argue for the abolition of slavery; 100 years ago, the British government put women in prison for asking for votes; fifty years ago, most of the founding fathers of today’s developing nations were being hunted down by the British and the French as ‘terrorists’.
As the Italian Marxist Antonio Gramsci said, we need to have pessimism of the intellect and optimism of the will.

Ha-Joon Chang, Economics: The User’s Guide, 2014:460

Economics has a fundamental influence on our long-term and day-to-day lives. In many ways, the global economy is the beating heart of human civilization. If it is not kept in good health, the whole planet suffers. 

As much as I wanted to use my postgraduate studies as an opportunity to gain a full-fledged education in politics, I also wanted to use it to gain a solid understanding in the production, consumption and transfer of wealth.

However, I wanted to study economics from a progressive and constructive point-of-view. This led me to Kate Raworth’s masterful Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist, a book and economic philosophy so impressive, I named this module after it. 

Doughnut Economics presents the case for a new economic paradigm shaped like a doughnut. The doughnut provides for every person’s basic needs while also safeguarding the living world on which we all depend. 

Below the Doughnut’s social foundation lie shortfalls in human well-being, faced by those who lack life’s essentials such as food, education and housing. Beyond the ecological ceiling lies an overshoot of pressure on Earth’s life-giving systems, such as through climate change, ocean acidification and chemical pollution.
Between these two sets of boundaries lies a sweet spot – shaped unmistakably like a doughnut – that is both ecologically safe and socially just space for humanity. The twenty-first century task is an unprecedented one: to bring all of humanity into that safe and just space.

Kate Raworth, Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a Twenty-First Century Economist, 2018:44-5

 

Using the doughnut as my economics compas, not only pointed me in the right direction for making the world a more fair and just society, but its radicalism encouraged me to jump back and examine the successes and failings of classical and neoliberal economic thinking.