10 Courses

Global Health: An Interdisciplinary Overview

Platform: Coursera

Institution: University of Geneva

Started: 06/03/2019

Finished: 11/03/2019

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Global Health and Humanitarianism

Platform: Coursera

Institution: The University of Manchester

Started: 08/09/2017

Finished: 11/03/2019

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A History of Public Health in Post-War Britain

Platform: Coursera

Institution: London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

Started: 09/07/2018

Finished: 10/07/2018

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One Health: Connecting Humans, Animals and the Environment

Platform: FutureLearn

Institution: University of Basel

Started: 18/05/2017

Finished: 11/03/2019

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The Impact of Climate Change on Health

Platform: FutureLean

Institution: European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT)

Started: 11/03/2019

Finished: 12/03/2019

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Plagues, Pestilence and Pandemics: Are You Ready?

Platform: FutureLearn

Institution: Griffith University

Started: 07/08/2018

Finished: 08/08/2018

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Healthcare Research

Platform: FutureLearn

Institution: Coventry University

Started: 13/02/2018

Finished: 21/02/2018

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The Science of Medicines

Platform: FutureLearn

Institution: Monash University

Started: 23/08/2018

Finished: 01/09/2018

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Medical Humanity: Engaging Patients and Communities in Healthcare

Platform: FutureLearn

Institution: Taipei Medical University

Started: 15/06/2018

Finished: 23/06/2018

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Systems Thinking In Public Health

Platform: Coursera

Institution: Johns Hopkins University

Started: 28/02/2019

Finished: 11/03/2019

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Global health covers a vast international area going beyond a nation’s borders, while public health is more focused and specialised within a country, community or population. Both fields are extremely crucial for the health of the world.

Queen Mary University of London, What is the difference between Public Health and Global Health?

Global health is public health.

You only have to look at something like the COVID-19 pandemic to realise that the health of all living organisms is just one interconnected system. Global health can also very easily fall into a very fragile state when it does not receive the proper investment, care and attention, as the COVID-19 outbreak has also illustrated.

During my undergraduate studies, I became increasingly interested in looking after my health and, by extension, I started to become more knowledgeable about the field of public health. I was going to incorporate my increasing interest in achieving optimum health into my MTA Portfolio and, because Global Citizenship was already a concentration, it became obvious that I should also add a module on global health.

Studying global health also gave me another lens through which to understand the concept of systems thinking: when you view systems from a broad perspective that includes seeing overall structures, patterns and cycles in systems, rather than seeing only specific events.

Then COVID-19 came along and gave me an even more immediate lens through which to understand the systemic nature of global health.